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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
's why she had so many fans all over mexico, united states, central and south america, because she was a real woman and she will express her feelings on stage, off stage, anywhere. >> and raul, what are your listeners saying about her this morning? >> they are devastated. we were covering the news yesterday when we heard about the plane not making it from monterrey to her destination. we were covering the news since early. everybody was in shock. this morning i woke up. i was in shock. i couldn't believe it. i he memean, it's just been a h- it's just been a hard few hours. radio listeners, a lot of fans -- jenni rivera had true core hard core fans, and i mean, everybody is devastated. there's been some rumors of kidnapping, of, you know -- this is -- all of these are obviously not true. >> raul, thank you so much for bringing us obviously your listeners and the real story about her and how special she was and raphael as well. really kind of an extraordinary woman, someone who had a lot of attention but also was very much like anybody else really. >> that's right. she had an incredi
as the on poll i go. >> reporter: the gangnam style song is poking fund of south korea's gangnam district, hence the equine themes. but little subtlety about a song in 2004, lashing out at america's involvement in the iraqi war and their presence in south korea. psy was covering another band song with lyrics translating to violent retaliation against american forces accused of wartime torture and abuse. he has since apologized profusely. speaking of the limits of the language of self-expression and saying he was deeply sorry for how those lyrics that could be interpreted. some say that doesn't jibe with taping at national building museum. in this heady highly political sized times in washington, nothing can be done without a political angle. inside the production team rehearsed. outside in the spirit of the holidays, a public less concerned with controversy, real or perceived. >> it would be tough. i mean, especially to the people. >> reporter: and even a bit of advice for the south korean pop star. >> i would say keep it to the music and stay out of the whole political stuff, you know. >> repor
to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed throughout the years. former presidents now have a global presence and are often seen as de facto representatives
-american and the political history still as imagined in the world and it was once described as the mac of america. you described it as a personality passion was the percussive and syncopated rhythms that have become the soundtrack of the burgeoning south side. he was handy with the drums himself and his jazz lover. there was no better place to be in the 1920s than chicago, the epicenter of the nation's blues and jazz recording industry. >> what is lovely actually about writing about chicago in that time was how many luminaries were there. i think langston hughes was wandering through chicago or louis armstrong and his first days of playing there. there are a lot of people going through chicago then. >> and just to affirm to my local audience -- [laughter] langston hughes, this auditorium we are in his name for langston hughes and he certainly spent many many years here at the schomberg library doing research and doing original pieces of work there are collection so we certainly have benefited from his life and his legacy. chicago also had a dark side and there is a slide that i would like to turn two
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)